Framing

For this task, I was asked to find a spot somewhere in the college, and use the camera to take framing shots such as the wide shot, Close Up, Extreme Close Up, Mid Shot, Medium Close Up, Medium Long Shot, Long Shot and a couple others. I used a classmate as the subject and angled the camera and told my model to pose accordingly to achieve the shot I wanted. I learnt during this assignment how important the cinematographer’s job is in portraying the story of the film to the audience in a particular way, just by the way they use framing techniques.

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WIDE SHOT / ESTABLISHING SHOT

This shot shows the location of the scene, and let’s the audience know where the story is taking place.This can be used at the beginning of the scene, ass the first image shown, or right after the subject has been introduced.

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EXTREME CLOSE UP

This shot zooms right in on the character, or object, and stresses it’s significance. It puts emphasis on what you want the audience to focus on. This can be used at any point in the film. It can depict for example, what is going on in the characters mind and thought process, as it is solely focused on a small part of her face. It can also emphasise to the audience her emotion, especially as the eyes are a great place that reveal it.

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CLOSE UP

This shot also tells the audience to focus on the subject, but it can simply be for the actors dialog. It can also be used to show expression and emotion like the extreme close up, just not in as much of a dramatic way.

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MEDIUM CLOSE UP

This shot cuts along the chest of the character. It shows the subject clearly and in detail without getting so close that it becomes slightly uncomfortable. This can also be used for when the actor is speaking, to put attention on her.

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MID SHOT

This shot is taken at mid distance. It is about the same distance that one is to another person when speaking in real life, making the shot more natural. In a casual conversation, one typically focuses from the head to the mid section of the body, not close up to the face and also not all the way down to the feet. This shot can be used for dialog when it’s main purpose is to give information rather than show emotion.

img_6338MEDIUM LONG SHOT

This frames the entire subject from head to knees, and shows the subject in relation to its background. This technique can be used with multiple people in the frame, so that the audience can get a detailed view of more than just one character, without it being too  far away.

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LONG SHOT

This shows the whole of the subject. It can be used as the first shot in a film to introduce the actor or object in it’s entirety with relation to it’s surroundings.

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LOW ANGLE SHOT

This makes the subject look superior and intimidating. It can represent power and strength, and straight away gives the audience an insight into the nature of the character and what role he or she is going to play in the film. Also, if the camera’s direction is being used as a point of view of another character in the film, it can reveal how this character feels about the one in front of the camera. They may be someone who has power over them, or someone they look up to.

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HIGH ANGLE SHOT

This shot makes the subject look inferior and weak. Opposite to the low angle shot, this framing technique prompts emotions such as vulnerability. The same technique of point of view from another character can be applied to this shot too,  which shows the feelings of the character behind the camera and in front of it.

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OBSCURE ANGLE

This shot involves the camera being tilted deliberately to one side. It gives the audience the impression that the subject is off balance, or the character is confused about it’s surroundings. Together with props and the right themes within the scene, it can create quite a dramatic effect, creating an uneasy and frantic atmosphere.

 

In all, it is clear that the right framing techniques through cinematography can take the storytelling aspect of the film production to higher level, making the film come together successfully. Framing is vital in drawing in the audience and getting their attention, emphasizing themes, telling them the story in a clear way and hinting certain moods without having to use dialog to do so.

 

 

Composition

 

 

SYMMETRY

symmetry-harry-potter

This picture was taken from a Harry Potter Film, and is a great example of the use of symmetry in a frame. It involves creating an image that can be split directly in half, with the two parts being equal. The line that splits the image is called the line of symmetry, and it can either run horizontally or vertically. It was described by photograph blogger Kamur, S. that it can “create a sense of harmony, balance and proportion. It soothes the eyes and mind of the viewer.”

 

LEADING LINES

This picture, taken from the film Drive shows the composition technique of leading lines. Elements within the picture create lines that lead to a specific point in the distance, making the audience focus on this point.

THE RULE OF THIRDS

(CGDirector 2013)

This composition technique involves splinting the image into 9 equal boxes, so that the image looks like a grid. The subject, commonly a person, is supposed to pass directly through one of the vertical lines, as displayed in the picture above. It acts as a guide for the framing of an image. To create a shot for the movie that is well balanced, in proportion and engaging, this technique is very useful.

DEPTH (BACKGROUND)

i-am-legand-depth

This technique puts emphasis on the background imagery of a shot in relation to it’s subject. It can be used to show the audience the location and environment of where the story is taking place, and can be used as an establishing shot.

DEPTH OF FIELD

social-network-depth-of-field

Filmmaking Blogger Gabe Moura defined Depth of Field as the range of acceptable focus on a shot or photograph. It is ideal when wanting to put the audiences attention on just one of the subjects, so hat they are not distracted by the background within the shot but  are instead focused on this subject for emotional or dramatic effect.

NATURAL FRAMING

space-odossey-natural-framing

This framing technique involves the surroundings and elements within the image forming a ‘natural frame’ around the main subject that the audience is meant to focus on. In the above image, the door of what may be a spaceship frames the three astronauts standing in the centre of the picture.


The below images are ones that I took myself to portray the same framing techniques that were explained above.

Leading Lines

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Natural Framing

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Symmetrical

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Depth

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Rule Of Thirds

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REFERENCES

 

Harry Potter , http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01660/library_1660052i.jpg

Battle of Five Armies, http://lotr.wikia.com/wiki/Battle_of_Five_Armies

Idris Elba as Commandant, http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/34804739/idris-elba-says-netflix-films-like-beasts-of-no-nation-should-be-up-for-oscars

I Am Legand ‘Im Listening’ Soundtrack, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtYgjGRKVXM

Fincher’s The Social Network is a perfect marriage about an imperfect team, https://coolpapae.com/2011/02/12/finchers-the-social-network-is-a-perfect-marriage-about-an-imperfect-team/

Alien, http://www.filmbrute.com/film-look-examples/

Wavelength Media, MediaCollage.com. http://www.mediacollege.com/video/shots/mid-shot.html

Wavelength Media, MediaCollage.com. http://www.mediacollege.com/video/shots/dutch-tilt.html

Basics of Video Shooting, https://www.asu.edu/alti/ltlab/tutorials/video/basics/type3_mls.htm

http://www.school-of-digital-photography.com/2014/01/using-symmetry-to-improve-your-photography-composition.html

hhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHVbbcHWX4k

How to Use Leading Lines for Better Compositions

http://www.cgdirector.com/tag/film/

http://www.photographymad.com/pages/view/rule-of-thirds

Depth of Field

 

 

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